Very Bad Men

Very Bad Men

Very Bad Men is a true crime documentary series that airs on Investigation Discovery and the Oprah Winfrey Network Canada.

I worked in post production as an archival researcher — working with the editors, directors and crime investigators, I helped collect visual documents such as crime scene photos, legal documents, court materials and licensed news footage for the series.

 

REMIXING CULTURE: THE DOCUMENTARY

REMIXING CULTURE: THE DOCUMENTARY

REMIXING CULTURE was the first short length documentary I produced as part of my Masters dissertation at the University of British Columbia’s School of Journalism.

The project was featured in Volume 2 of the University of Copenhagen’s digital academic journal, Audiovisual Thinking.

If you’re fancy, you can read the abstract above the video links, but if not, I completely understand.

Today’s digital world has presented itself with problems of ownership in relation to music production and distribution on the Internet. Focusing on electronic dance music, this project examines the close relationship between music and technology, and the influence that each exerts on the other.

The accessibility of music and video files on the Internet has transformed the music business from a primarily physical industry (distribution via compact discs, vinyl and cassette tapes) to a digital soundscape, a democratized space where amateur musicians can be music creators. These online spaces, with the help of open source music software, have bridged the gap between the media producer and the media consumer. As this project explores, cultural implications are vast, leaving ordinary people with the responsibility to take control of their cultural landscapes.

The project takes the form of an essay-styled documentary highlighting interviews with notable DJ’s, music software programmers, technology experts and copyright scholars. Inspired by a documentary entitled RiP! A Remix Manifesto (2009), a film that encouraged active remixing, this project’s purpose is to emphasize the importance of reinterpretation and rediscovery in our cultural soundscape. This project is licensed under Creative Commons, a non-profit organization that supports non-commercial use of digital intellectual property, and its secondary purpose is to encourage the public to incorporate the film into other projects, furthering the conversation about the importance of remix.

This research project determined that with the growth of open source, social-powered music software, remix music and associated musicians will continue to create their art using source material by other artists. Despite the efforts of copyright authorities and stakeholders in the professional music recording industry, remix culture is pervasive in every other aspect of society and thus will continue to shape the landscape of our future cultures.

 

The Making of Bido Lito!

The Making of Bido Lito!

For this project, I was working as a contributing editor for the up and coming Liverpool music magazine, Bido Lito!

In anticipation for the website being launched, I shot, edited and produced this short online presentation to showcase the features of the website, in addition to showing the vibrance and emerging talents of the Liverpool music scene.

 

Discorder Magazine

Discorder Magazine

Discorder Magazine is Vancouver’s longest running independent music magazine published by CiTR 101.9 FM. We’ve been supporting local music for 30 years now, starting in 1983, a year after CiTR hit the FM dial in 1982. We’re one of the established and trusted voices of Vancouver music and arts culture in the Lower Mainland. Discorder is one of a few magazines published by a community radio station, and we only serve the freshest and most local goods.

I began as a contributor in 2007, writing on topics of local music and interviewing and reviewing acts. In 2009 I was promoted to the Editorial Position for the  Under Review section, assigning and managing a team of music writers and preparing copy for the online and physical editions.

Symafour

Symafour

Symafour is a GDUSA Award-winning social media application that connects you to other people in your area based on similar interests. Are you trying to make it to a music festival, but don’t know who anyone who loves music as much as you do? Are you tired of your so called “friends” that never want to go to the same movies you do? It’s your interests, it’s your meet ups, it’s your data.

Type 2 Designs developed this social mobile app for the iOS platform, including the design, artwork, digital advertising and social media marketing. Using Facebook as our main channel to showcase the app, we have nearly 10,000 fans on the page and have experienced a steady growth in downloads. Our agency also designed and created the Symafour website and logo.

I developed a series of digital marketing strategies and advertising that we used to garner engagement and more downloads.